Solo the Soul
Patrick Stump Daily
Woah, ho! It’s been a hot minute since I’ve been over here. I started this blog when news about Patrick was sparse, hard to find and all over the GD place. When he launched his site, started tweeting and posting his own news, I let it fall to the way side. 
Now I do Patrick Stump Daily. So many of you post awesome and wonderful pictures and stories of his concerts, I thought it all needed a place to go. PStump fans are fierce as shit, ya’ll. Get to know each other! We also post/reblog news, the random picture or two and whatever else comes up. Follow the new blog if you like and thanks for the support and the follows with this one. I didn’t say much, but I got to know a lot about a lot of you on my time line. You guys are beautiful. Stay safe.

Patrick Stump Daily

Woah, ho! It’s been a hot minute since I’ve been over here. I started this blog when news about Patrick was sparse, hard to find and all over the GD place. When he launched his site, started tweeting and posting his own news, I let it fall to the way side. 

Now I do Patrick Stump Daily. So many of you post awesome and wonderful pictures and stories of his concerts, I thought it all needed a place to go. PStump fans are fierce as shit, ya’ll. Get to know each other! We also post/reblog news, the random picture or two and whatever else comes up. Follow the new blog if you like and thanks for the support and the follows with this one. I didn’t say much, but I got to know a lot about a lot of you on my time line. You guys are beautiful. Stay safe.

The friends are going head-to-head in the second round of the MTV tournament, right now on the Newsroom blog.
By James Montgomery

 
Patrick Stump 
Photo: Michael Caulfield/ WireImage

On Monday, when we revealed the second-round matchups in our Musical March Madness tournament, few clashes stood out quite like the #4 Rise Against/ #12 Patrick Stump tilt in the Midwest region.

After all, this is a battle between friends. Both acts hail from Chicago, both have come up together (RA frontman Tim McIlrath was actually in a band with Fall Out Boy’s Pete Wentz back in the day), and both share a respect for the other. So, it’s nothing short of cruel that there can be only one winner.

Second-round voting is now under way in the Midwest region over on the Newsroom blog!

And that sentiment is shared by Stump himself, who spoke to MTV News about his MMM matchup Tuesday morning (March 22). He is conflicted, to say the very least.

“It’s kind of one of those win/lose kind of things … there’s really not a clear victory,” he said. “Because if I lose, I guess I lose — ‘Hey, no big deal’ — because I like Rise Against. I would’ve voted for Rise Against if I weren’t in it anyway, so it’s a conflict. … I don’t know how honest I want to be, because Rise Against is a pretty good band. I will be very happy with whomever wins this.

“In a perfect situation, we [wouldn’t be] up against each other,” he continued. “Because if I didn’t have a record coming out and I wasn’t in this election at all, it would be fun to watch, and I would be cheering for Rise Against. This is, by definition, a conflict of interest. … What do I choose? I don’t know.”

While he’s quick to throw his support behind Rise Against — a tact his FOB mate Wentz employed in his first-round matchup against the band, much to his detriment — Stump isn’t about to go quietly into the night. In fact, he’s in MMM to win.

“I’m saying, ‘Vote your conscience.’ Vote what you really feel, man,” he laughed. “I know I would vote for Rise Against if I weren’t me. Well, that’s not true. I know I would vote for Rise Against if I weren’t a Patrick fan. And I am, because I’m me.”

But even if he doesn’t win, Stump’s already happy with his MMM showing. Mostly because he didn’t even expect to beat Neon Trees in the opening round. And really, at this point, anything can happen. After all, as the lone 12 seed left in the tournament, he’s already the underdog of underdogs.

“If I make it past this, I honestly don’t know what I’ll do,” he said. “I’m really surprised I beat Neon Trees, and I know I was kind of goofing around and stuff, but, for real, I didn’t expect to have any chance against them. I was pretty shocked. I’m Mr. Upset.”

Older and on his own, singer of defunct chart-toppers Fall Out Boy becomes a “Soul Punk”

Andy Downing

Special to Metromix
March 19, 2011

Things have been fairly quiet for Patrick Stump since Fall Out Boy went on hiatus in November 2009. But that’s all about to change.
 
The singer, born and raised in suburban Glenview, recently released a six-song teaser EP of wildly-varied arena-pop sketches dubbed “Truant Wave,” culled from material leftover from recording sessions for his long-in-the-works solo debut. Initially scheduled for a February release, that full-length record, “Soul Punk,” is now expected in June.
 
In the interim, Stump—still one of the most underrated vocalists in pop music—is hitting the road for a handful of shows, including a pair of intimate homecoming gigs at Schubas. Reached at home in Los Angeles in late February, the 26-year-old discussed the challenges of going solo, how his John Hughes-ian upbringing helped him survive Fall Out Boy’s success and if fans can ever expect to see the band reunited.

What’s the most enthusiastic fan reaction you had to deal with in Fall Out Boy?

 I remember we played in Texas once years and years ago and some girl was up in the front row. There were kids pushing from behind and she broke her arm on the edge of the stage. We stopped playing, brought her up the side and called her an ambulance. She refused to leave because she wanted to see the rest of the show. It was a stalemate. “No. We’re not going to play until you go to the hospital.” “I’m not leaving until you play.”
 
How did you keep yourself grounded throughout that Fall Out Boy roller coaster?
 

I was still pretty young when the band took off, but for the most part I had enough of the traditional John Hughes, suburban Chicago childhood that it outlasted a lot of the other influences.
 
Did you have to pause and take some time off to figure out who you wanted to be as a solo artist?
 
The weird thing is that I didn’t pause. I went right into it then took a step back and said, “Okay, what is this? Who is this?” The first pass at “Soul Punk” was really, really scatterbrained. I mean, that’s kind of where the title comes from in the first place. It’s really easy for a lot of my friends to assume I’m going to put out an R&B record. And it’s really easy for pop culture to assume I’m going to put out a punk record. But I’m really neither. I’m my own me.
 
Are you going for the one-man-loops-everything, Jon Brion at Largo-type approach at Schubas?
 
There might be some intimate moments, but I’m not doing my troubadour, Jim Croce on the stool kind of show. I’m bringing a band—in part because I finally saw the Jon Brion show. I’ve known about him for a long time, but I never actually went and saw him. Afterwards it was like, “Yeah, he does this way better than me. I shouldn’t do this.”
 
What’s the status of “Soul Punk”?
 

I had intended to release it this month. And it’s ready. It’s been ready. I finished the record and I was getting ready to go to mastering and then I wrote a song that totally changed the whole record for me. When you do that it throws everything else off. An artist has whims and them I guess the rest of the people figure out the logistics [laughs].
 
Has that been one of the challenges of going solo, not having someone to counter those whims?
 
Yes, absolutely. Learning to discern when you have a bad idea is a really strange thing. It’s kind of trial by fire. At times I really need to keep my inner Kubrick in check. You can totally pour over an album way too long and pour over the individual details way too much. I remember one quote from Kubrick where he said his one biggest regret was that he didn’t make more movies.
 
Just don’t die and leave Steven Spielberg to finish “Soul Punk,” like Kubrick with “Eyes Wide Shut.”
 
[Laughs] I think that’s going to happen. I think I’m going to die and Spielberg is going to finish my album.
 
You recorded every instrument on “Soul Punk.” Why was it so important to you to approach things in that manner?
 
Well, because it’s really easy to fake these things now, isn’t it? Fall Out Boy made enough of a splash that I’m sure people think I have a lot of money. It probably wouldn’t be too far-fetched for me to hire a bunch of really big songwriters and producers and made a big, Auto-Tuned hit record. So I said to myself, “I want to make sure that I know that I did everything myself.” It wasn’t something where I paid someone to do that. I was actually pouring over every detail.
 
Was getting back into lyric-writing a challenge for you after all those years in Fall Out Boy where Pete Wentz handled that end of things?
 
It’s definitely weird. Years ago I used to write for the band. I even had a three-ring binder where I kept all the lyrics. Then one day we were in an accident heading out to shoot a video for [a track off of “Take This to Your Grave”] and the binder got crunched in the van. We would have needed the Jaws of Life to get this book out. So I stopped writing.
 
Once you started writing again, did it take you some time to find that voice?
 
Absolutely. When I stopped I was 19. You get older and your tastes and feelings change. I found I used to be a lot wordier. It’s almost like I had all these records that nobody heard and nobody will ever hear where I was a completely different writer. I know in my head how I evolved to get to where I am now, but no one will ever get to see that.
 
The lost years.
 
Yeah, right. That book is somewhere in some junkyard. We can fill in the gaps there. It’s going to be found like Metropolis 100 years from now.
 
Was there a particular song where the writing started to click for you?
 
Yeah, but not anything that’s on “Truant Wave” or “Soul Punk” or that will ever see release. As a writer, if you figure out how to tell a good-enough joke, then you write a comedy. You have these little epiphany moments. And that’s all it was. I had a couple little songs that just kind of came out in a strong enough way where it was like, “Well, I don’t know about this song, but I think I can write again.”
 
When I listen to “Truant Wave” songs like “Porcelain” and “Big Hype,” I get the sense you have some conflicted views on fame.
 

It’s interesting that you noticed a connection because I didn’t really think about the parallels between “Porcelain” and “Big Hype” in that way. Big hype, big letdown. In life, there are so many of those experiences that are supposed to be your “Wonder Years” moments or whatever and they come and you’re like, “That’s it?” It’s almost a little bit of me taking the piss out of fame. On the last two Fall Out Boy records we were blasted for singing about fame when I knew that a lot of those lyrics weren’t actually about that. This is me getting the fame out of my system, like, “Okay, fine, I’m actually going to write about it this time.” Then that’s it. No more.
 
Do you see a Fall Out Boy reunion happening any time in the next ten years?
 
Of course. The four of us never had a conversation where we were like, “[Forget] you, man! I quit!” That never happened. We’re all still friends, and as far as I know we’re still a band. I would be surprised if we didn’t do something.
 
I think part of it is that phrase indefinite hiatus. When you hear that the first thought is, “They’re done.”
 
And it sucks, because what do you call it anymore? Somebody ruined it. Maybe the Police? Have we played together in the past two years? Yeah. Joe and I sat together and played guitar for awhile. Andy and I played some stuff. Pete and I played some stuff. We haven’t all four gotten in the same room and played together, but the band never broke up. I think we needed to go back and recollect ourselves and for some reason it turned into “Why did you guys break up?” Or “Thank god they broke up!”
 
You had a guest spot on “Law & Order” a few years back. Is there another show you’d like to appear on?
 
I feel like scripted television, aside from comedies, has kind of fallen off. There’s not a lot of stuff I’m really enthralled with now besides “Treme.” But at the same time, I want to be able to just watch it and enjoy it.
 
What if they could animate you and put you in “Archer”?
 
[Laughs] Dude, I would do that in a heartbeat. I’m pretty in love with “Archer” and “Bob’s Burgers.” “Archer” is probably my favorite one. I feel like, kinetically, they’re going to run out of steam at some point…and they never do. There’s always another joke.
 
What kind of character do you envision for yourself?
 
I’ve been typecast as a nerd, so I would love to do anything not nerdy. It was cool that on “Robot Chicken” I got to play Roadblock from “G.I. Joe” and Morpheus from “The Matrix.” My impressions are so out of practice though. They’re getting wispier by the day. Somebody needs to hire me for something soon or I’m going to lose all my impressionist cred.
 
Patrick Stump Personality Test
What’s the last album you bought? “It’s some Odd Future instrumentals record. I don’t remember the name of it because they didn’t release it under the name Odd Future, but it’s definitely them.”
Song you’ve listened to on repeat recently? “Me and Mrs. Jones” by Billy Paul “I don’t know why. It just happened.”
Song you never want to hear again? “With Arms Wide Open.” “I’m sorry. I know Creed’s the punching bag, but I really don’t want to hear that song ever again.”
Best concert you’ve seen in the last year? Janelle Monae. “It’s almost the best live show I’ve ever seen.”
New band you don’t know personally that deserves to be big? Foster the People “They have this song ‘Kids With the Pumped Up Kicks.’ It’s killer.”
Favorite movie ever? “Ghostbusters” “I want to say ‘Seventh Seal.’ I want to drop Fellini in there, but it’s really just ‘Ghostbusters.’”
Chicago’s best music venue? “I always have a soft spot for Metro.”

Here is a sweet article about Codie Rae, the 5 1/2 year old, three-legged German Shepherd from Patrick’s “Spotlight” video.

In his first solo video, Stump gets positive, grabs the spotlight for himself.

Last week, Patrick Stump told MTV News that his brand-new Truant WaveEP wasn’t Take This to Your Grave, Part II, and if the 23rd-century pop&B sonics of the thing weren’t enough to convince you of that fact, well, then perhaps his “Spotlight (Oh Nostalgia)” video will.

Because the clip — which premiered Monday (February 28) on PopDust — is most certainly a departure from everything he did in his former (they’re still on hiatus, right?) band Fall Out Boy. That’s mostly because, unlike basically every late-period FOB vid, it’s not cluttered with questionable plot devices, winking in-jokes and cloying promotional shots. Instead, it’s a sunny, simple, homemade thing — a straightforward, decidedly uplifting bit of DIY inspiration.

In short, it may very well be the best video Stump’s ever been associated with.

Shot in dreamlike slo-mo, the video showcases a host of kids excelling at various feats — skateboarding, extreme pogo-sticking, urban gymnastics, sticking their tongue out really far — and, in the process, becoming the kings and queens of their own little kingdoms. That message gibes with the hook of the song (basically that you can “be your own spotlight,” no matter how inconsequential your talents) and, when coupled with the youthful exuberance of the video’s stars, the end result is a truly captivating, unapologetically positive experience.

And it bears mention that, throughout the video, Stump appears to be experiencing the same posi-vibes as the kids he’s surrounded by. Whether he’s trying (and failing miserably) to match the cup-stacking talents of one of his co-stars or simply drifting through a skate park belting out the song’s hook, he seems — for the first time in a long time — to be completely unencumbered, free of whatever burden you’ve probably assigned to him and content to just do his own thing. He cracks up. He smiles. He’s doing this his own way.

And in that regard, the “Spotlight” video is also a success, because it shows Stump following his own advice. By stepping out as a solo artist, he’s grabbing his own spotlight, becoming the ruler of his very own kingdom. This is the video he’d longed to make — free and clear and straight from the heart. It’s not Take This to Your Grave, Part II because it wasn’t supposed to be. As a video, it’s something much better.

@PatrickStump releases the video for “Spotlight (Oh Nostalgia)”

Very charming. Very well shot. I think it suits the song perfectly. What do you guys think?

patrickstumptheleprechaun:

His video will kill me if he looks like this throughout it <333333

"We kicked off the new year with a music video shoot for the new solo project of FALL OUT BOY’s Patrick Stump. Joe Wein directed and VISAYA FILMS has co-produced this charming, funny and amazing video. Can’t give away too much, while it is still in post production, so check back for more, soon!" - Visaya Films

patrickstumptheleprechaun:

His video will kill me if he looks like this throughout it <333333

"We kicked off the new year with a music video shoot for the new solo project of FALL OUT BOY’s Patrick Stump. Joe Wein directed and VISAYA FILMS has co-produced this charming, funny and amazing video. Can’t give away too much, while it is still in post production, so check back for more, soon!" - Visaya Films


Erstwhile Fall Out Boy frontman’s solo EP made iTunes debut Tuesday.

Of course, that rejoicing was tempered some when it was subsequently announced that Stump had pushed back Soul Punk in favor of a six-song EP called Truant Wave. And on Tuesday, with little lead-up and absolutely zero promotion, that EP premiered on iTunes. It not only provided FOB fans a preview of where Stump is headed, musically, but also served as a point of division among their ranks. Some loved the electronic-leaning, R&B-teasing jams, while others, well, they were probably hoping Stump would return to his pop-punk roots.

When he spoke to MTV News on Thursday, Stump addressed both sides of the issue, because, quite frankly, he understands why some would be upset by his new direction. In fact, that’s part of the reason he put out Truant Wave in the first place: to soften the blow.

"I really want Soul Punk to have as much of a chance to have it be listened to discerningly,” he laughed. “And if I’m going to disappoint people by not [making] Take This to Your Grave, Part II, I would rather do that beforeSoul Punk, because that record means something to me.”

Of course, there were other reasons for rushing the EP out, most of which he learned the hard way during Fall Out Boy’s final days.

"Remember when Fall Out boy was putting out Folie à Deux and were going to put it out on Election Day, and then, for all these various reasons, all signs pointed to ‘Don’t do this’? That was sort of the case here. The logistics just weren’t lining up,” he explained. “And I had way too much material. … A lot of it didn’t make sense on the record, but it still felt like something, so I made a little mini-record out of them, and it sort of became a concept record for me. So for all those reasons and more, I decided, ‘Screw it, I’m going to put this out.’ “

So, yes, Soul Punk is still coming, but in the meantime, Stump hopes fans will take the time to digest the tunes he’s presenting on Truant Wave, a shiny menagerie of rubber-band funk, electro-pop and spacey, 23rd-century R&B that’s also, as Stump explained, a bit of a concept record too.

"It’s not as strict a concept album in that I don’t have a narrator or epic space battles or anything like that. It’s pretty bare-bones and it works as a pop record," he said. "Basically, I took this idealistic, naive little character, and at the beginning of the record, he has the best intentions, the highest hopes, and, as you get towards the middle of the record, he’s just such an a—hole. And then the character gets really dark, and then, at the end, I envisioned him being really down and out in Hollywood, like drunk and telling someone, ‘Look, kid, don’t make the same mistakes I did.’ … It has a narrative, but it’s not like I named the characters or know anything about these things."

So, for now, with his EP just out and a sold-out run of shows on the horizon, Stump is content to sit back and watch fans figure out his new direction. And, at the moment, he couldn’t be happier with the results.

"I told people about this record a week ago, two weeks ago, there was no promo, no press, nothing, so, for it to do as well as it has, it’s definitely gratifying," he said. "In the back of my head, there’s always this little voice that’s like, ‘Just don’t blow it,’ and so far, so good, you know?"